Tag Archives: film

Youthwork Summit Talk

In May, Marc Williamson and myself had the privilege to speak at the national youth workers conference, “The Youthwork Summit” in London on “The Kingdom of God in 5 films”.

You can watch the talk here

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Our Youthwork Summit Talk: The Responses

As I said yesterday,  Marc Williamson and I spoke at a national youth work event, “The Youthwork Summit” in London on Saturday around the issue of film and youthwork. You can read the transcript here.

The feedback from our talk has been brilliant and I have had the opportunity to engage with people through twitter and face-to-face about some of the concerns or issues they have surrounding it.

What I’d like to do now is to respond to some of the general queries people have had about what we said so that dialogue can continue. That is the main reason we want to explore films. We want to engage in conversation and I am only too happy to talk to those who agree or disagree with what we have to say.

Foreword

Let me say first of all that we were not endorsing any of the films that we spoke about. I do not agree that we should be endorsing any film over another regardless of what we think of it. Rather, I am keen to see dialogue with films that young people are watching. We may disagree with what they watch, and there are times when we should say that, but what I want to see more of is youth workers talking about those films with their young people. There were a couple of people who said they didn’t pick up on that aspect so I wanted to state that before I go any further.

Where are the other themes?

We only had ten minutes to try and communicate kingdom themes in five films. Everyone has a different opinion of what the Kingdom is and its values. But we had a limited time to speak of what we say as the overarching narratives: return from exile, reconciliation, incarnation, identity and sacrifice. There are many more and a longer presentation would have allowed us to tease out more of these concepts.

We shouldn’t be encouraging young people to watch horrible films

One of the films we discussed during the talk was “Saw 3D”. I knew that picking this film would cause an issue.  Some others also disagreed with our choices of “Twilight” and “Bridesmaids”. I understand that. People have very strong opinions to films; whether it be ones they like or dislike. There are many reasons why we may dislike certain films. We may find them offensive or sick or whatever but we have to be aware of our own preferences and not try to push them them on to others.

I understand that many people will consider “Saw” and other horror films sinful and corrupt and that we should not be encouraging our young people to watch them. I have no issue with that. But in my experience simply telling young people not to watch something often results in them watching it. What I’d rather see is that if you’re young people are watching films like this, rather than simply ignore it or give them a lecture, engage with them. That doesn’t mean you need to watch the film but find out about its theme so that you can discuss it. Talk to them about the good and the bad things about it and help the young people make informative choices.

You won’t be able to work with them all their lives and it is better to give them the tools to critically watch all kinds of films so that they will do this long after they’ve left the youth group.

Suitability of films

This sort of ties in with the last point but I think its slightly nuanced. What are suitable movies? That’s a good question. Those that had issue with some of the films we talked about said that they weren’t ‘suitable’. Either because of violence, or the oppression of women etc. Again, I understand that. But again I ask, what is suitable? If our young people are all over 18, can we not show them an 18 rated film just because it has violence and sex? Is it wrong to show them these kinds of film? Who decides that?

My problem is that in most christian films discussion resources, the only films that are used are ‘safe’ films. Ones that have positive themes and are rated for children. But is this healthy? What is that telling our young people? Now I’m not saying that just because a horror film is really big at the time, that we show that to them. But if they have all seen it then it might be worth discussing it. We too easily put culture into good and bad categories. But that’s not good practice.

I hope this has been helpful and please feel free to comment and keep the discussion going.

 

Youth Work Summit Talk

Hi

Last weekend I, along with my colleague Marc Williamson, spoke at the Youthwork Summit in London on “The Kingdom of God in 5 films”. I really enjoyed the talk and speaking to folks afterwards (those who agreed and disagreed). I’ll be blogging about the whole event soon and also replying to a few of the comments that people share about our talk specifically.

We are keen for dialogue in film. We want to discuss and explore ideas together. Both with those who agree and disagree with our opinions.

A full transcript of our talk (including the bits we had to cut out for time) is now up online on our film site. please take a look at it here and let me know what you think.

Thin Places in “The Cabin in the Woods”

This is now my fourth post dissecting the film, “Cabin in the Woods“.

You can read the others here, here and here.

For a film I rated three stars, it really has taken up a lot of my time. And I always knew that would be the case.

What the film tries to do is be a dissertation on horror movies whilst still being a horror movie itself. I think Joss Whedon (co-writer) and Drew Goddard (co-writer/director) do an amiable job and I praise them for taking a shot at something really different but like a dissertation paper, it all feels a little too academic.

In my previous posts I discussed the connection between the film and the concept of the atonement and its connection with ‘the hunger games’. In this post I wish to discuss the film and its connect with the theology of ‘thin places’. Like all the previous posts, this will contain SPOILERS.

A thin place is where the veil that separates heaven and earth is lifted and one is able to receive a glimpse of the glory of God.

There are numerous accounts in the Old Testament where Heaven seems to invade earth. One of the most famous is when Moses encounters God in a bush in Exodus chapter 3. In the Jewish tradition, Moses built a tabernacle that claimed to hold the very presence of God. Later, King Solomon built a Temple (a large scale tabernacle) where it was believed that, in the very centre of the temple (the holy of holies), Heaven invaded earth. The Priest could enter through the curtain and come face to face with the living God. When Jesus was crucified, the gospels record that the curtain was torn in two as a sign that Heaven has now broken out on earth.

There have been times in my own life, where like Moses, it felt like the ground I stood on was holy. That in that moment I encountered another world; that for a brief second i was able to, as Paul wrote to the church in Corinth,

“fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.

I believe that the mythology of “Cabin in the Woods” also includes this concept. The cabin is the ‘thin place’ where the physical world and the spiritual world collide. It is where the doors open and the creatures and beasts of the spiritual world are unleashed into the physical world. The film conveys that there are ‘thin places’ all over the world where these two worlds collide.

In the film, only ‘Marty’ realises that the cabin is a ‘thin place’. The rest are oblivious. I believe that in our own lives, we can be so focused on the day to day things that we miss the thin places in our lives.  Jesus talk his disciples to prayYour Kingdom come, Your will be done on earth as it is in Heaven”.

In that simple prayer, he was showing the disciples that they need to take their eyes off of their lives and open themselves up to the bigger picture. It’s the same with us. If we focus all our attention on our own lives then we miss out on what God is doing, and in some way prevent the Kingdom of Heaven from expanding. There are times when instead of advancing the Kingdom of Heaven, through our words and actions we actually advance the dominion of Hell. When we lie, cheat, steal, horde and oppress, we force the Kingdom of Heaven to retreat.

Here are some questions to explore with the young people you work with who have seen the film?

1) Have you ever encountered a ‘thin place’ where there seemed to be more going on that what you could see? Where things felt differently?

2) What stops you encountering these places more often?

3) What can we do practically to see the Kingdom of Heaven spread wider?

 

The Hunger Games VS The Cabin in the Woods Part 1

It’s holy week. It is the time of the year when Christians enter into the story of Jesus’ last days. It is the time of year when Christians think about sacrifice.

It’s funny then that in the space of 24 hours, I watched two films at the cinema that both deal with the theme of sacrifice: ‘The Cabin in the Woods’ and ‘The Hunger Games‘.

I have already written a post detailing my initial thoughts of “cabin’ here but Ill summarise the plot here: (spoilers)

The film follows five college students who spend the weekend at a cabin and are killed off one by one. What soon becomes clear to the survivors is that they are part of a worldwide sacrificial system to appease the Gods who live underneath the ground.

For many the story of ‘Hunger Games’ is more familiar but here is a quick summary courtesy of IMDB:

Set in a future where the Capitol selects a boy and girl from the twelve districts to fight to the death on live television, Katniss Everdeen volunteers to take her younger sister’s place for the latest match.

The Hunger Games, the annual event where the young people kill each other, was established after some of the inhabitants staged an uprising. The Games are a reminder of what the people did and why they should never try it again. In some way the fighters are living sacrifices, killed to appease the President.

Both films deal with a worldwide sacrificial system, involving young people, that is set up to appease and entertain. In “cabin’ the young people do not know that they are part of it, whereas in ‘Games’ they do. Both films also end with the survivors choosing to turn against the system.

But there are key differences that mark out the films.

In ‘Cabin’ the Gods are angry. They want death and destruction and so the sacrificial system is set up to entertain them and take their minds off of killing everyone. It is a barter system. If they do not get their sacrifices, their will be bloodshed on a colossal level. Millions will die. What the film seems to suggest is that this is a continuation of the sacrificial system that has taken place since before the Old Testament was written and their are glimpses of Old Testament scenes in the opening credits. To sum it up, this systems primary function is to appease the God’s wrath.

In ‘Games’ the primary function of the sacrificial system is to remind the people of their guilt and through that, subdue them. It is not about appeasing a God or Gods but instead, it is a symbol of oppressive power and authority.

As I reflect on these movies and there sacrificial structures I see some similarities between them and the atonement (the crucifixion of Jesus) as well as some key differences.

In the next post I’ll explore this a little further.

“Woman in Black” Youth Group Resource

The Daniel Radcliffe starring, Hammer Horror film ” The Woman in Black” is a brilliant gothic horror story and one that has found mass appeal because of the “Harry Potter’ effect.

I want to pick up on a couple of the themes of the film that may be worth exploring with the young people you work with (if they’ve seen it). As always I would suggest using the reel faith template of questions when creating a discussion.

*Spoiler Alert*

Justice and Forgiveness

These two themes run throughout the film and can make for a very lively discussion. After learning that the woman in black is killing children because she is still angry about the death of her son, Kipps takes matters into his own hands and believes that if he can reunite the mother and child then the mother will finally be able to rest. She will be able to find peace and the horror will end.

He finds the body of her son in the marsh and carries him back to the house. The woman in back turns up to reclaim him and Kipp believes that peace has been found. But things are not that simple. We hear the ghostly voice of the woman say “I will never forgive” and in the climax of the film, she leads Kipps son on to the railway tracks as an oncoming train approaches. Kipps runs to save him and both are killed.

The woman in black is driven by vengeance and a twisted view of justice. Because her child was taken from her, she believes that every child should be taken away. She believes that every parent should feel the same pain that she did. It was her lack of forgiveness that killed her and it is that unforgiveness that will torment the village for eternity.

Anger is a serious thing. Unforgiveness is a serious thing. What does it take to forgive someone? Are there people that we are unwilling to forgive?

The woman in black sought vengeance and anger and she found it. It destroyed her life and the countless other lives of the villagers.

What motivates us and leads our lives? Is it anger? A thirst for revenge? Is there another way? Does Jesus offer something different?

“Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven.”

World Views

Half way through the film, Daily (played by Ciaran Hinds) says to Arthur Kipps (Randliffe), “if we open the door to superstition, where does that lead?” Daily plays the rational character of the story. He is well aware that many of his neighbours have said they have seen the ‘woman in black’ and in fact his own wife has been driven insane by her but he chooses not to believe it. The world is a rational place and everything can be explained. He urges Kipps not to pursue this line of enquiry as who knows where it will lead.

I find this whole idea fascinating. Both characters, Daily and Kipps have a specific worldview. They filter everything they see and hear through those particular lenses. Daily rationalises the occurrences away as nothing more than brain trickery. Kipps sees the same things but chooses to believe that the woman in black is real and both of those worldviews have particular consequences.

For Daily, it results in him not getting the right care for his wife and ignoring her ‘eccentric’ actions. Their marriage is damaged as a result. For Kipps, it ultimately results in the death of both his son and him.

These words of Jesus’ are recorded in the gospels:

“Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you.”

Whatever we seek, we will find. I believe that to be true. If we choose to see the world through a particular lens, then we will filter everything through that lens and it will be a self fulfilling prophecy. There is nothing inherently wrong with that but what is vital is that each of us are aware of the lenses that we wear and that others may not have the same ones.

What lenses do your young people wear? How do they believe the world works? How do you work with people who have a different worldview than yours?

Practical ways of using film in youth work: Part 2

Yesterday I wrote about one way of using film with your youth group. read it here.

Today I want to offer another option.

Character Study

In all the youth work books that I have read that offer film clip discussions, I have never seen any offer character studies. By that I mean looking at a specific character in a film and discussing their journey through it. In many films, characters have an arc that they go through. They start at one place in the beginning and end up somewhere else by the end. It may be that their beliefs have changed or they achieved something but in most cases, a change happens.

An interesting way of using film with your youth group (or church) would be to start this change over a number of weeks and look at the decisions the character is making. You could show the film in the first week of the month (similar to the structure of my last post) and then over the course of the rest of the month, chart the progression of the character or simply look at their worldview concerning different issues.

This could result in a rewarding study that helps young people appreciate the characters in film and discuss whether they would make the same decisions if they were in their shoes.

I’ve put an example below of the George Clooney movie, “The Descendants“.

Week 1:      Watch the movie and have short discussion on the George Clooneys character

Week 2:      What kind of person is the character at the start of the movie? What are his relationships like?

Week 3:      Dealing with grief or shocking revelations

Week 4:      What kind of person is the character at the end of the movie? What has changed?

Practical ways of using film in youth work: Part 1

I run a website with fellow ICC graduate Mark Williamson called reel faith which seeks to offer an alternative view on how films should be used in youth work. I taught an open evening lecture on the subject at the international christian college on Thursday 1st March and myself and Mark are speaking about the same issue at the youthwork summit in London on May 19th. I have also written a number of blog posts on the subject of why we should no longer be using two minute clips from films to simply make a theological point. Read them here or here.

As you can see, dialogue between film and faith is incredibly important to me.

At the lecture at ICC I offered a couple of practical ways films could be introduced into your youth work programme and over the next couple of blogs, I want to outline those ideas.

One Month Film Study

Start by showing the film at your group on the first week of the month. Show the film in its entirety and have a discussion using the questions I have suggested previously. What will become obvious is that there will be two or three major themes that the young people highlight from any given film and on that evening you can have a brief discussion about those themes and find out what the young people think about them.

For the three remaining three weeks I would suggest looking at one theme a night. I find this a great way to do youth work as the talks and discussions you will then be giving for the rest of the month have been suggested by the young people. It is issues that they want to wrestle and grapple with and the young people should be more engaged with you because of that. It also means that rather than coming with your own agenda for a particular film, you are letting the film speak for itself and allowing open dialogue to flow out of it.

So in theory you could do two or three films over a year and spend a month looking at each one of them. You are no longer spoon feeding young people about issues within films and instead are giving them the tools to critically engage with film and culture in general themselves.

An example could be Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2

Week 1-      show the film

Week 2-      ‘Going against the flow’

Week 3-      ‘Integrity’

Week 4-      ‘Sacrifice’

Have a go yourselves and put your comments and thoughts up on here or on the reel faith site. We’d love to hear them.

Reel Faith discussion at ICC

On Thursday night, I had the pleasure of hosting an evening at the International Christian College in Glasgow, looking at how we use film in christian youth work and how it could be developed. Below is a summary of what I said:

I started by asking three questions to get folks thinking:

1)             What is your favourite genre?

2)             Can you think of a time when a film changed you in some way?

3)             How do you use film in church or with young people?

Introduction

Films are stories and stories have been around for thousands of years. Judaism used a form of oral storytelling as a way of self definition. It helped them to understand who they were, how they came to be and who there God was. Jesus used parables (stories) to communicate the kingdom of God. And today, we use film to do the same.

Moses encountered God in a burning bush. Moses would have walked past that bush many times but on that occasion God chose to make that place holy. On that occasion heaven collided with earth. In Celtic theology, this is understood as a ‘thin place’. A place where heaven and earth collide. I believe film can be thin places. Places where we encounter the divine.

Film Theory

Historically there has been five ways in which people have interacted with film:

1)    Avoidance- (steer clear)

2)    Caution (watch with suspicion)

3)    Dialogue (a belief that films can have theological themes)

4)    Appropriation (we can achieve greater insight about god and ourselves)

5)    divine encounter (we can encounter God and be transformed)

Group Question

1) which view do you most often hold?

How we have historically used film with young people?

The Matrix Red/ Blue Pill clip

1)             Who has used this clip in their youth work or seen it used in youth work before?

It’s not wrong to show a two-minute clip but what you need to ask, is, the theme I am communicating through the clip true for the rest of the movie?

What other themes appear in ‘The Matrix’?

The blurring of humans and machines, Sex and sensuality, Fate and freewill, mirrors. The blurring of the real world and the simulated world. Philosophical themes of Descartes, Socrates, Plato, bondage and S&M, sexual ecstasy and orgies.

Do any of these ideas conflict with the Christian worldview? By endorsing one theme, are we endorsing the themes we do not agree with?

Now you make think this is all nonsense and unnecessary. Maybe there is nothing wrong with cherry picking scenes from movies that fit the message we want to share. We realise that we shouldn’t read the bible out of context. the bible out of context. Because it’s wrong and can and has lead to all sorts of misunderstanding and oppression. The bible has been used to condemn and oppress all sorts of people because readers have cherry picked what they have wanted to hear. We come to the bible, not with an agenda, but to hear the inspired words of God. I believe we should be doing the same with film.

So what’s the alternative?

Part 3- A new kind of film criticism

Rather than picking out specific scenes to a film your young people might not have seen, why not start by watching a film and then allowing a discussion to take place over a period of time. Rather than having an agenda, let the film speak for itself. You could then do a whole series of discussions and chats around the themes of one particular film, showing a short clip to refresh their memory.

This also gives young people the tools to be able to do this on their own when their watching films or TV programmes.

Here are the questions that I believe are useful to helping people unpack a film.

What the key themes that this film is trying to engage with?

Ø      What is the film trying to tell you about this?

Ø      Is this the commonly held perception of this?

Ø      What’s your perception of this?

Ø      What’s the biblical perception of this?

Ø      Do these compliment or conflict with each other?

Can you see yourself in any roles / do you identify yourself with any characters?

Are there any background influences from writers/directors that shape the view?

We then watched my short film ‘prodigal’ about a repentant Satan trying to re-enter Heaven and used the questions as a test-case study.

Further Reading

Higgins G        “How movies helped save my soul”
Johnston R       “Finding God in the Movies”
Johnston R       “Reframing theology and film”
Johnston R       “Reel Spirituality”
Ortiz G          “Explorations in theology and film”
Sogaard V        “Media in Church and Mission”

Your Dream Home

Nobody quite does graphic satirical horror like the Chinese (well maybe the Japanese. And the Koreans.)

‘Dream Home’ follows the story of Cheng Li-sheung as she looks to finally invest in her dream home. A home that she has wanted since she was a little girl. A home that she promised to her gran and papa. A home that will make everything okay. We all know what happens with best laid plans though. The deal falls through as the sellers want more money. At her wits end, and her obsession with owning the flat pushed to breaking point, Li-sheung embarks on a horrific killing spree in order to bring the price of the flat down.

Very dark stuff.

When watching the film I was reminded of these words of Jesus: “What good is it for a man to gain the whole world, yet forfeit his soul”. There are a number of translations and interpretations of these words. What exactly does it mean to gain the world? What does it mean to forfeit/lose your soul/life?

For me, to lose your soul/ life, means to lose what it means to be human. To become sub-human. To lose the essence of your humanity.

Desmond Tutu once said; “We can be human only in fellowship, in community, in koinonia, in peace.” So when we distort that fellowship, when we break it down through the abuse or murder of other humans, we become less than human.

If you can stomach it, Cheng Li-sheungs journey is the journey of losing her soul. For her, a possession becomes more important than the life of others: both strangers and family members. The potential flat holds so many hopes and dreams. She thinks it will be the answer to all her problems. And we can’t really blame her for thinking that. The culture around her has pushed this idea on to her. Now obviously what she does we cannot condone but we can understand how she gets to this place of desperation.

And she gets what she wants. With the blood of eleven people on her hands: she gets what she wants. And in the final moments of the film, after moving into the flat, she hears on the radio of the economic meltdown and the housing collapse. It has all been futile. the flat she has just bought is now worth less than half what she paid for it. A satirical final moment in this modern day parable.

What do we long to possess? What do we think will make our lives better?  And what are we willing to do to get it? Where do these narratives and messages come from and how can we stand up against them?

Pressing questions in the world we find ourselves in right now.