Thin Places in “The Cabin in the Woods”

This is now my fourth post dissecting the film, “Cabin in the Woods“.

You can read the others here, here and here.

For a film I rated three stars, it really has taken up a lot of my time. And I always knew that would be the case.

What the film tries to do is be a dissertation on horror movies whilst still being a horror movie itself. I think Joss Whedon (co-writer) and Drew Goddard (co-writer/director) do an amiable job and I praise them for taking a shot at something really different but like a dissertation paper, it all feels a little too academic.

In my previous posts I discussed the connection between the film and the concept of the atonement and its connection with ‘the hunger games’. In this post I wish to discuss the film and its connect with the theology of ‘thin places’. Like all the previous posts, this will contain SPOILERS.

A thin place is where the veil that separates heaven and earth is lifted and one is able to receive a glimpse of the glory of God.

There are numerous accounts in the Old Testament where Heaven seems to invade earth. One of the most famous is when Moses encounters God in a bush in Exodus chapter 3. In the Jewish tradition, Moses built a tabernacle that claimed to hold the very presence of God. Later, King Solomon built a Temple (a large scale tabernacle) where it was believed that, in the very centre of the temple (the holy of holies), Heaven invaded earth. The Priest could enter through the curtain and come face to face with the living God. When Jesus was crucified, the gospels record that the curtain was torn in two as a sign that Heaven has now broken out on earth.

There have been times in my own life, where like Moses, it felt like the ground I stood on was holy. That in that moment I encountered another world; that for a brief second i was able to, as Paul wrote to the church in Corinth,

“fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.

I believe that the mythology of “Cabin in the Woods” also includes this concept. The cabin is the ‘thin place’ where the physical world and the spiritual world collide. It is where the doors open and the creatures and beasts of the spiritual world are unleashed into the physical world. The film conveys that there are ‘thin places’ all over the world where these two worlds collide.

In the film, only ‘Marty’ realises that the cabin is a ‘thin place’. The rest are oblivious. I believe that in our own lives, we can be so focused on the day to day things that we miss the thin places in our lives.  Jesus talk his disciples to prayYour Kingdom come, Your will be done on earth as it is in Heaven”.

In that simple prayer, he was showing the disciples that they need to take their eyes off of their lives and open themselves up to the bigger picture. It’s the same with us. If we focus all our attention on our own lives then we miss out on what God is doing, and in some way prevent the Kingdom of Heaven from expanding. There are times when instead of advancing the Kingdom of Heaven, through our words and actions we actually advance the dominion of Hell. When we lie, cheat, steal, horde and oppress, we force the Kingdom of Heaven to retreat.

Here are some questions to explore with the young people you work with who have seen the film?

1) Have you ever encountered a ‘thin place’ where there seemed to be more going on that what you could see? Where things felt differently?

2) What stops you encountering these places more often?

3) What can we do practically to see the Kingdom of Heaven spread wider?

 

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  1. […] Thin Places in “The Cabin in the Woods” (smoorns.wordpress.com) […]

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