Tag Archives: christopher nolan

The System has failed us! More musings on the Dark Knight Rises

SPOILERS AHEAD

What do we do when the system fails us?

I believe it’s a question that is at the heart of the Nolans’ Dark Knight trilogy but one that the films fail to answer.

For Bruce Wayne, the system that is set up to protect the people of Gotham has failed and he becomes Batman to rectify that. He removes himself from the system and becomes a vigilante. But as I’ve discussed in my previous post, he doesn’t succeed. Batman is part of the problem. It is because of him that the violence escalates. Gotham is worse off because of Batman.

Raz A’Ghul in Batman Begins also believes that the system has failed but his response is to burn Gotham to the ground and start over. He believes that a fresh start is the answer. But we can all hopefully agree that this is not the way to do it.

At the end of The Dark Knight Rises (SPOILER) John Blake also believes that the system has failed and takes the drastic step to follow in the footsteps of the Dark Knight.

The films are full of people for whom the system has failed. But what is their response? Work outside the system? Destroy the system? None of these ultimately work.

So what’s the alternative?

It’s a question I’m not sure I have the answer to yet but I want to continue the discussion. As a youth worker, I feel these are important questions to chat through with young people.

We live in a corrupted world in which the system has failed us. MPs, police officers, bankers and the church have all let us down. How do we respond?

How do you respond? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

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Give us our endings!

Here’s a post I wrote for the website “reel faith”

We all love a good ending don’t we?

The problem is, Hollywood (and every other network) does not seem to want to give us one.

This Summer we have had ‘Snow White and the Huntsman‘, ‘Prometheus’ and now ‘The Amazing Spiderman‘ which all fail to tie up loose ends in the hope that we will tune in for another installment.

And it’s not just films that are guilty of this.

I enjoyed the six part ‘Hit and Miss’ drama on Sky Atlantic a couple of months back until the last episode which refused to tie up any plot strands and left us instead with a “second series cliffhanger”. Can’t we just have a TV series that ends well and doesn’t force us to watch the next series in the hope of some resolution?

The truth is, this is nothing new. Films and TV shows have been doing this for years. I gave up on ‘Lost’ a number of years ago after failing to resolve any plot strands after two seasons.

This probably all sounds like I’m against ‘cliffhangers’ in TV shows and films but I’m really not. There are plenty of TV shows and films that weave it in successfully. I enjoy ‘Fringe’, ‘Dexter’ and ‘Breaking Bad‘ and they all tease another series in each of their season finales.

Films like ‘Batman Begins‘, ‘X-men 2’ ‘Spiderman’ (admittedly all super hero films) all end with a sequel tease and, in my opinion, pull it off well. In fact, I think these examples make the film better.

So why do some work and others don’t?

Films and TV shows need to be able to stand alone. If I choose not to watch the next series or the sequel, I need to feel like that film or series’ main plot strands have been wrapped up. Let’s use ‘Batman Begins’ as an example.

At the end of the film, Bruce Wayne has become Batman and the villain (Raz Al’Ghul) has been defeated. The films’ main plot has been resolved. Yes it then sets up the introduction of The Joker but if I decided never to see ‘The Dark Knight‘ I’d be happy that the film delivered what it set out to accomplish.

The problem comes when a TV show or film fails to tie up its main plot strands and expects the audience to tune in to the next series or sequel to find resolution. That’s not right. I’ve spent my money; I’ve sat through a series; I expect a conclusion.

For me, I have similar ideas when it comes to my Christian faith. I like doubt. I like questions. I like the grey areas of faith.

As a youth worker, I walk the fine line between answering all of the young peoples’ questions and leaving room for ambiguity. Faith shouldn’t be wrapped up in a neat little box. We shouldn’t be able to answer all of the questions. We need to leave room for the ‘what ifs’. We need to need to help young people find some answers but also leave them wanting more.

It’s okay not to resolve all the ‘plot strands’ of the christian faith but we need to be sensitive to the young people we work with in order to know which ones to resolve and which ones to leave open ended.

Inception and the Power of Ideas

***SPOILER WARNING***

I could write pages and pages about the different theories and thoughts I had when watching the film but for this particular post I will focus solely on the power of ideas.

Cobb (Dicaprio’s character) explains to Ariadne (Page’s character) the power of ideas.

“What’s the most resilient parasite? An Idea. A single idea from the human mind can build cities. An idea can transform the world and rewrite all the rules.”

He later discusses that an idea can change who a person becomes. It affects every part of them.

Ideas are dangerous. They affect everything we do or say.

Almost two thousand years ago a man called Paul shared an idea with a church in Colossae:

“He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. 16For by him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by him and for him. 17He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy. 19For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, 20and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross.”

Paul was transformed by an idea. The disciples were transformed by an idea. I am transformed by an idea.

It is not about words or complex theology or right intellectual understandings, but about images.

Jesus, the image of the invisible God.

In a couple of weeks I take up the post as youth worker for South Beach Baptist Church in Saltcoats. I am reminded that the young people I see will not be captivated by words or musings. They will be captivated by images. by ideas.

Ideas that transform the way they see the world. The way they act.

“An idea can transform the world and rewrite all the rules.”